7 Things Anyone Can Do to be A Better Person (That Require Zero Talent)

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I think most of us want to be a better person – but if we think about it, being better sounds like this huge thing that we need to spend a lot of time on. Like, I might need to go on a ten day yoga retreat or something (that sounds terribly expensive to be honest). But that’s not the case. Recently I’ve made it a point to be mindful about the little ways that I’ve behaved, going just a little further. Here are a few things I’ve implemented in my life that truly – or at least I think so – have made me a better person.

Be punctual and prepared
This one is huge. If you’re the type of person who is always running late, you forget your stuff – haven’t read a file yet that you need for a meeting, aren’t prepared for class, etc – this is probably one of the first things you’ll want to work on. It’s a mentality difference really. Always being punctual and prepared will make you look so much more professional and put together. Not to mention it’s a great way to reduce stress.

Be polite
Saying please and thank you go a long way. If you’re the type of person that dismisses others if they give you a compliment, think twice. Or may be your parents or partner always does something for you, and it’s kind of become a habit, make it a point to thank them for what they do for you. Making people feel appreciated is so important!

Choose to be kind
It’s a bit cliché, but you don’t know someone’s story. This is one I need to be very mindful of and to be honest, I still struggle with it sometimes. It’s not that I’m not kind to people, but sometimes I think not-so kind thoughts in my head or I get annoyed about very little things. I am now actively trying to be aware of this and instead, have more positive thoughts.

Don’t give advice if people don’t ask you for it
You know those people that give you unwanted advice when you tell them something? I know I’m not alone when I say those people get on my nerves. For me, it happens a lot with my back problems. People will tell me not to walk, or not to sit. Or to go for massages or hot yoga, not knowing what actually works for me. At the same time, I realize that they do this with the best intentions. People give advice because they want to help you. If you’re one of those people that gives out unwarranted advice, next time, try to think twice. Not everyone wants your advice, and you’re not always to most qualified person to give it.  Continue reading

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Building Confidence And Self-Esteem: 3 Things That Helped Me

In my opinion, the importance of confidence and having a high opinion of yourself is vastly underrated. We act like having confidence would be nice, but it’s not a necessity.

Guess what. It totally is.

I think there is some confusion as to what it actually means to have self-esteem. Some people think that having lots of friends and being successful will improve our self-esteem. Others think that losing weight will get rid of their low self-esteem. Or that you have to actually accomplish something in order to be able to have self-esteem in the first place.

None of that is true. Put simple, Self-esteem just means that you appreciate yourself for who you are, including your faults and flaws. Self-esteem means that you know you are worthy, that you are good enough and you deserve everything you have.

In the past few years, I’ve really improved my self-esteem. I went from being a girl who thought she wasn’t worth the space she took up in a classroom, to a passionate, much more confident person that has come to appreciate her own strong personality. Of course, not every day is amazing, but I mostly feel good about who I am and I take pride in the things I stand for and my abilities and accomplishments. Today, I want to share three things that have really helped me get there.

Take a self-esteem inventory

‘You can’t fix what you don’t know’ is a sentence one of my therapists once said to me. It always stuck with me. Before we can start working on our self-image, we need to identify irrational thoughts and negative self-talk.

When I was in therapy at the age of fourteen, my therapist made me draw a line on a piece of paper. On the left side, she wanted me to list 10 strengths, and on the right side 10 weaknesses. I didn’t have a lot of difficulty coming up with ten weaknesses, but it was hard to come up with the strengths. My therapist made me look at it from a different perspective: had others told me they thought I was a good at something? I recalled times where people had called me smart, witty, a good writer. People had told me that they enjoyed my blog posts (man I’ve been around for a while) and they thought I told cool stories. Viewing it from this perspective, it was much easier to come up with 10 strengths.

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